Jane eyre free book download

05.10.2021 By Jeremy Sandifer

jane eyre free book download

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  • I was glad of it: I never liked long walks, especially on chilly afternoons: dreadful to me was the coming home in the raw twilight, with nipped fingers and toes, and a heart saddened by jane chidings of Bessie, the nurse, and humbled by the consciousness of my physical inferiority to Eliza, John, and Georgiana Reed.

    The said Eliza, John, and Georgiana were now biok round their mama in the drawing-room: she eyde reclined on a sofa by the fireside, and with her darlings about download for the time neither quarrelling nor crying looked perfectly happy. Be seated somewhere; and until you can speak pleasantly, remain silent.

    A eyre adjoined the drawing-room, I slipped in there. It ryre a bookcase: I soon possessed myself of free volume, taking care that it should be one stored with pictures. I mounted into the window-seat: gathering up jae feet, I sat cross-legged, like a Turk; and, having drawn the red moreen curtain nearly close, I was shrined in double eyre.

    Folds of scarlet drapery shut in my view to the right hand; to the left book the clear panes of glass, protecting, jane not separating me from the drear November day. At intervals, while turning over the leaves of my book, I studied the aspect of that winter afternoon. Afar, it offered a pale blank of mist and cloud; near a scene of wet lawn and storm-beat shrub, with ceaseless rain sweeping away wildly before a long and lamentable blast.

    The words in these introductory pages connected themselves with the succeeding vignettes, and gave book to the rock standing up alone in a sea of billow and spray; to the broken boat stranded on a desolate coast; doownload the cold and ghastly moon glancing free bars of cloud at a wreck just sinking.

    I cannot download dowlnoad sentiment haunted the quite solitary churchyard, with its inscribed headstone; its gate, its two trees, its low horizon, girdled by a broken wall, and its newly-risen crescent, attesting the fre of eventide.

    Fantasy Fiction Books PDF, Novels PDF, Romance Books PDF. Jane Eyre is a very famous novel by English author Charlotte Bronte. Jane Eyre published under the title of “Currer Bell” by Smith, Elder & Co. of London on date 16 Oct The American Edition of Jane Eyre was published the same year by Harper and Brothers in New grocify.coted Reading Time: 1 min. JANE EYRE “Jane Eyre” is a novel by English writer Charlotte Brontë.It was published on 16 October , by Smith, Elder & Co. of London, England, under the pen name “Currer Bell”. Primarily of the Bildungsroman genre, Jane Eyre follows the emotions and experiences of its eponymous heroine, including her growth to adulthood and her love for Mr. Rochester, the Byronicmaster of. Jul 15,  · Download free book Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë epub, pdf, audiobook Jane Eyre, the story of a young girl and her passage into adulthood, was an immediate commercial success at the time of its original publication in Brand: Romance.

    So was the black horned thing seated aloof on a rock, surveying a distant crowd surrounding a gallows. Each picture told a story; mysterious book to my undeveloped understanding and imperfect feelings, yet ever profoundly interesting: as interesting as the tales Bessie sometimes narrated on winter evenings, when she chanced to be in good humour; and when, having brought her ironing-table to the nursery hearth, she allowed us to sit about it, and while she got up Mrs.

    With Bewick on my knee, I was then happy: happy at least in my way. I feared nothing but interruption, and that came too soon. The breakfast-room door opened. Madam Mope! And I came out immediately, for I trembled at the idea of being dragged forth by the said Jack. John Reed was a schoolboy of fourteen years old; four years older than I, for I was but ten: large and stout for his age, with a dingy and unwholesome skin; thick lineaments in a spacious visage, heavy limbs and large extremities.

    He gorged himself habitually at table, which made him bilious, and gave him a dim and bleared eye and flabby cheeks. John had not much affection for his mother and sisters, and an antipathy to me. He bullied and punished me; not two or three times in the week, nor once or twice in the day, but continually: every nerve I had feared him, and every morsel of flesh in my bones shrank when he came near.

    There were moments when I free bewildered by the terror he inspired, because I had book appeal whatever against either his menaces or his inflictions; the servants did not like to offend their young master by taking my part against him, and Mrs. Reed was blind and deaf on the subject: she never saw him strike or heard him abuse me, though he did both now and then in her very presence, more frequently, however, behind her back.

    Habitually obedient to John, I came up to his chair: he spent some three minutes in thrusting out his tongue at me as far as he could without damaging the roots: I knew he would soon strike, and while dreading the blow, I mused on the disgusting and ugly appearance of him who would presently deal it. I wonder if he read that notion in my face; for, all at once, without speaking, he free suddenly and strongly.

    I tottered, and on regaining my equilibrium retired back a step or two from his chair. Go and stand by download door, out of the way of the mirror and the windows. I did so, not at first aware what was his intention; but when I saw him lift and poise the book and stand in act to hurl it, I instinctively started aside with a cry of alarm: not soon enough, however; the volume was flung, it hit me, and I fell, striking my head against the door and free it.

    The cut bled, the free was sharp: my terror had passed its climax; other feelings succeeded. Also I had drawn parallels in silence, which I never thought thus to have declared aloud. Did you hear her, Eliza and Georgiana? He ran headlong at me: I felt him grasp my hair and my shoulder: he had closed with a desperate thing.

    I really eyre in him a tyrant, a murderer. I felt a drop or two of blood from my head trickle down my neck, and was sensible of somewhat pungent suffering: these sensations for the time predominated over fear, and I received him in frantic sort. Aid was near him: Eliza and Georgiana had run for Mrs.

    Reed, who was gone upstairs: she now came upon the scene, followed by Bessie and her maid Abbot. We were parted: I heard the words—. I resisted all the way: a new thing for me, and a circumstance which greatly strengthened the bad opinion Bessie and Miss Abbot were disposed to entertain of me.

    Your young master. There, sit free, and think over your wickedness. They had got me by this time into the apartment indicated by Mrs. Reed, and had thrust me upon a stool: my impulse was to rise from it like a spring; their two pair of hands arrested me instantly. Miss Abbot turned to divest a stout leg of the necessary ligature.

    This preparation for bonds, and the additional ignominy it inferred, took a little of the excitement out of me. Reed: she keeps you: if she were to turn you off, you would have to go to the poorhouse. I had nothing to say to these words: they were not new to me: my very first recollections of existence included hints of the same kind.

    This reproach of my dependence had become a vague sing-song in my ear: very painful and crushing, but only half intelligible. Miss Abbot joined in—. They will have a great deal of money, and eyre will have none: it is your place to be humble, and to try to make yourself agreeable to them. The red-room was a square chamber, very seldom slept in, I might jane never, indeed, book when a chance influx of visitors at Gateshead Hall rendered it necessary to turn to account free the accommodation it contained: yet it was one of the largest and stateliest chambers in the mansion.

    A bed supported on massive pillars of mahogany, hung with curtains of deep red damask, stood out like a tabernacle in the centre; the two large windows, with their blinds always drawn down, were half book in festoons and falls of similar drapery; the carpet was red; book table at the foot of the bed was covered with eyre crimson cloth; the walls were a soft fawn colour with a blush of pink in it; the wardrobe, the toilet-table, the chairs were of darkly polished old mahogany.

    Out of these deep surrounding shades rose high, and glared white, the piled-up mattresses and pillows of the bed, spread with a snowy Marseilles counterpane. Scarcely less prominent was an ample cushioned easy-chair near the head of the bed, also white, with a footstool before it; and looking, as I thought, like a pale throne.

    This room was chill, because it seldom had a fire; it was silent, because remote from the nursery and kitchen; solemn, because it was known to be so seldom entered. Reed herself, at far intervals, visited it to review the contents download a certain secret drawer in the wardrobe, where were stored divers parchments, her jewel-casket, and a miniature of her deceased husband; and in those last words lies the secret of the red-room—the spell which kept it so lonely in spite of its grandeur.

    My seat, to which Bessie and the bitter Miss Abbot had left me riveted, was a low ottoman near the marble chimney-piece; the bed rose before me; to my right hand there was the high, dark wardrobe, with subdued, broken reflections varying the gloss of its panels; to my left were the muffled windows; a great looking-glass between them repeated the vacant majesty of the bed and room.

    I was not quite sure whether they had locked the door; and when I dared move, I got up and went to see. Returning, I had to cross before the looking-glass; my fascinated glance involuntarily explored the depth it revealed. I returned to my stool. Superstition was with me at that moment; but it was not yet her hour for complete victory: my blood was still warm; the mood of the revolted slave was still bracing me with its bitter vigour; I had to stem a rapid rush of retrospective thought before I quailed to the dismal present.

    Why was I always suffering, always browbeaten, always accused, for ever condemned? Why could I download please? Eliza, who was headstrong eyre selfish, was respected. Georgiana, who had a spoiled temper, a very acrid spite, a captious and insolent carriage, was universally indulged. Her beauty, jane pink cheeks and golden curls, seemed to give delight to all who looked at her, and to purchase indemnity for every fault.

    My head still ached and bled with the blow and fall I had received: no one had reproved John for wantonly striking me; and because I had turned against him to avert farther irrational violence, I was loaded with general opprobrium. What a consternation of soul was mine that dreary afternoon!

    How all my brain was in tumult, and all my heart in insurrection! Yet in what darkness, what dense ignorance, was the mental battle fought! I could not answer the ceaseless inward question— why I thus suffered; now, at the distance of—I will not say how many years, I see it clearly.

    Reed or her children, or her chosen vassalage. If they did not love me, in fact, as little did I love them. They were not bound to regard with affection a thing that could not sympathise with download amongst them; a heterogeneous thing, opposed to them in temperament, in capacity, in propensities; a useless thing, incapable of serving their interest, or adding to their pleasure; a noxious thing, cherishing the germs of indignation at their treatment, of contempt of their judgment.

    I know that had I been a sanguine, brilliant, careless, exacting, handsome, romping child—though equally dependent and friendless—Mrs. Reed would have endured my presence more complacently; her children would have entertained for me more of the cordiality of fellow-feeling; the servants would have been less prone to make me the scapegoat of the nursery.

    I heard the rain still beating continuously jane the staircase window, and the wind howling in the grove behind the hall; I grew by degrees cold as a stone, and then my courage sank. My habitual mood of humiliation, self-doubt, forlorn depression, fell damp on the embers of my decaying ire.

    All said I was wicked, and perhaps I might be so; what thought had I been but just conceiving of starving myself to death? That certainly was a crime: and was I fit to die? Or was the vault under the chancel of Gateshead Church an inviting bourne? In such vault I had been told did Mr. Reed lie buried; and led by this thought to recall his idea, I dwelt on it with gathering dread.

    Reed that she would rear and maintain me as one of her own children. It must have been most irksome to find herself bound by a hard-wrung pledge to stand in the stead of a parent to a strange child she could not love, and to see an uncongenial alien permanently intruded on her own family group. A singular notion dawned upon me. I doubted not—never doubted—that if Mr.

    Reed had been alive he would have treated me kindly; and now, as I sat looking at the white bed and overshadowed eyre also turning a fascinated eye towards the dimly gleaming mirror—I began to recall what I had heard of dead men, troubled in their graves by the violation of their last wishes, revisiting the earth to punish the perjured and avenge the oppressed; and I thought Mr.

    I wiped my tears and hushed my sobs, fearful lest any sign of violent grief might waken a preternatural voice to comfort me, or elicit from the gloom some haloed face, bending over me with strange pity. This idea, consolatory in theory, I felt would be terrible if realised: with all my might I endeavoured to stifle it—I endeavoured to be firm.

    Shaking my hair from my eyes, I lifted my head and tried to look boldly round the dark room; at this moment a light gleamed on the wall. Was it, I asked myself, a ray from the moon penetrating some aperture in the blind? No; moonlight was still, and this stirred; while I gazed, it glided up to the ceiling and quivered over my head.

    I can now conjecture readily that this streak of light was, in all likelihood, a gleam from a lantern carried by some one across the lawn: but then, prepared as my mind was for horror, shaken as my nerves were by agitation, I thought the swift darting beam was a herald of some coming vision from another world.

    My heart beat thick, my head grew hot; a sound eyre my ears, jane I deemed the rushing of wings; something seemed near me; I was oppressed, suffocated: endurance broke down; I rushed to the door and shook the lock in desperate effort. Steps came running along the outer passage; the key turned, Bessie and Abbot entered.

    I saw a light, and I thought a ghost would come. If she had been in great pain one would have excused jane, but she only wanted to bring us all here: I know her naughty tricks. Reed came along the corridor, her cap flying wide, her gown rustling stormily. I abhor artifice, particularly in children; it is my duty to show you that tricks will not answer: you will now stay here an hour longer, and it is only on condition of perfect submission and stillness that I shall liberate you then.

    Forgive me! I cannot endure it—let me be punished some other way! I was a precocious actress in her eyes; she sincerely looked on me as a compound of virulent passions, mean spirit, and dangerous duplicity. Bessie and Abbot having retreated, Mrs. Reed, impatient of my download frantic anguish and wild sobs, abruptly thrust me back and locked me in, without farther parley.

    I heard her sweeping away; and soon after she was gone, I suppose I had a species of fit: unconsciousness closed the scene. The next thing I remember is, waking up with a feeling as if Eyre had had a frightful nightmare, and seeing before me a terrible red glare, crossed with thick black bars. I heard voices, too, speaking with a hollow sound, and as if muffled by a rush of wind or water: agitation, uncertainty, and an all-predominating sense of terror confused my faculties.

    Ere long, I became aware that some one was handling me; lifting me up and supporting me in a sitting posture, and that more tenderly than I had ever been raised or upheld before. I rested my head against a pillow or an arm, and felt easy. In five minutes more the cloud of bewilderment dissolved: I knew quite well that I was in my own bed, and that the red glare was the nursery fire.

    It was night: a candle burnt on the table; Bessie stood at the bed-foot with a basin in her hand, and a gentleman sat in a chair near my pillow, leaning over me. I felt an inexpressible relief, a soothing conviction of protection and security, when I knew that there was a stranger in the room, an individual not belonging to Gateshead, and not related to Mrs.

    Turning from Bessie though her presence was far less obnoxious to me than that of Abbot, for instance, would have beenI scrutinised the face of the gentleman: I knew him; it was Mr. Lloyd, an apothecary, sometimes called in by Mrs. Reed when the servants were ailing: for herself and the children she employed a physician. Having given some further directions, and intimated that he should call again the next day, he departed; to my grief: I felt so sheltered and befriended while he sat in the chair near my pillow; and as he closed the door after him, all the room darkened and my heart again sank: inexpressible sadness weighed it down.

    Scarcely dared Book answer her; for I feared the next sentence might be rough. Missis was rather too hard. Sarah came back with her; they both went to bed; they were whispering together for half-an-hour before they fell asleep. I caught scraps of their conversation, from which Free was able only too distinctly to infer the main subject discussed.

    At last both slept: the fire and the candle went out. For me, the watches of that long night passed in ghastly wakefulness; ear, eye, and mind were alike strained by dread: such dread as children only can feel. No severe or prolonged bodily illness followed this incident of the red-room; it only gave my nerves a shock of which I feel the reverberation to this day.

    Yes, Mrs. Reed, to you I owe some fearful pangs of mental suffering, but I ought to forgive you, for you knew not what you did: while rending my heart-strings, you thought you were only uprooting my bad propensities. Next day, by noon, I was up and dressed, and sat wrapped in a shawl by the nursery hearth.

    I felt physically weak and broken down: but my worse ailment was an unutterable wretchedness of mind: a wretchedness which kept drawing from me silent tears; no sooner had I wiped one salt drop from my cheek than another followed. Yet, I thought, I ought to have been happy, for none of the Reeds were there, they were all gone out in the carriage with their mama.

    Abbot, too, was sewing in another room, and Bessie, as she moved hither and thither, putting away toys and arranging drawers, addressed to me every now and then a word of unwonted kindness. This state of things should have been to me a paradise of peace, download as I was to a life of ceaseless reprimand and thankless fagging; but, in fact, my racked nerves were now in such a state that no calm could soothe, and no pleasure excite them agreeably.

    Bessie had been down into the kitchen, and she brought up with her a tart on a certain brightly painted china plate, whose bird of paradise, nestling in a wreath of convolvuli and rosebuds, had been wont to stir in me a most enthusiastic sense of admiration; and which plate I had often petitioned to be allowed to take in my hand in order to examine it more closely, but had always hitherto been deemed unworthy of such a privilege.

    This precious vessel was now placed on my knee, and I was cordially invited to eat the circlet of delicate pastry upon it. Vain favour! I could not eat the tart; and the plumage of the bird, the tints of the flowers, seemed strangely faded: I put both plate and tart away. This book I had again and again perused with delight.

    Yet, when this cherished volume was now placed in my hand—when I turned over its leaves, and sought in its marvellous pictures the charm I had, till now, never failed to find—all was eerie and dreary; the giants were gaunt goblins, the pigmies malevolent and fearful imps, Gulliver a most desolate wanderer in most dread and dangerous regions.

    I closed the book, which I dared no longer peruse, and put it on the table, beside the untasted tart. Meantime she sang: her song was—. I had often download the song before, and always with lively delight; for Bessie had a sweet voice,—at least, I thought so. But now, though her book was still sweet, I found in jane melody an indescribable sadness.

    She passed into another ballad, this time a really doleful one. Why did they send me so far and so lonely, Up where the moors spread and grey rocks are piled? Yet distant and soft the night breeze is blowing, Clouds there are none, and clear stars beam mild, God, in His mercy, protection is showing, Comfort and hope to the poor orphan child. There is a thought that for strength should avail me, Though both of shelter and kindred despoiled; Heaven is a free, and a rest will not fail me; God is a friend to the poor orphan child.

    In the course of the morning Mr. Lloyd came again. Come here, Miss Eyre your name is Jane, is it not? Have you any pain? I cry because I am miserable. The good apothecary appeared a little puzzled. I was standing before him; book fixed his eyes on me very steadily: his eyes were small and grey; not very bright, but I dare say I should think them shrewd now: he had a hard-featured yet good-natured looking face.

    Having considered me at leisure, he said—. She must be eight or nine years old. Lloyd helped himself to a pinch of snuff. Bessie would rather have stayed, but she was obliged to go, because punctuality at meals was rigidly enforced at Gateshead Hall. Lloyd when Bessie was gone. Neither Bessie nor any book else will go into it at night, if they can help it; and it was cruel to shut me up alone without a candle,—so cruel that I think I shall never forget it.

    And is it that makes you so miserable? Are you afraid now in daylight? How much I wished to reply fully to this question! How difficult it was to frame any answer! Children can feel, but they cannot analyse their feelings; and if the analysis is partially effected eyre thought, they know not how to express the result of the process in words.

    Fearful, however, of losing this first and only opportunity of relieving my grief by imparting it, I, after a disturbed pause, contrived to frame a meagre, though, as far as it went, true response. I reflected. Poverty looks grim to grown people; still more so to children: they have not much idea of industrious, working, respectable poverty; they think of the word only as connected with ragged clothes, scanty food, fireless grates, rude manners, and debasing vices: poverty for me was synonymous with degradation.

    I shook my head: I could not see how poor people had the means of being kind; and then to learn to speak like them, to adopt their manners, to be uneducated, to grow up like one of the poor women I saw sometimes nursing their children or washing their clothes at the cottage doors of the village of Gateshead: no, I was not heroic enough to purchase liberty at the price of caste.

    She boasted of beautiful paintings of landscapes and flowers by them executed; of songs they could sing and pieces they could play, of purses they could net, of French books they could translate; till my spirit was moved to emulation as I listened. Besides, school would be a complete change: it implied a long journey, an entire separation from Gateshead, an entrance into a new life.

    Lloyd, as he got up. Bessie invited him to walk into the breakfast-room, and led the jane out. In the interview which followed between him and Mrs. From my discourse with Mr. Lloyd, and from the above reported conference between Bessie and Download, I gathered enough of hope to suffice as a motive for wishing to get well: a change seemed near,—I desired and waited it in silence.

    It tarried, however: days and weeks passed: I had regained my normal state of health, but no new allusion was made to the subject over which I brooded. Reed surveyed me at times with a severe eye, but seldom addressed me: since my illness, she had drawn download more marked line of separation than ever between me and her own children; appointing me a small closet to sleep in by myself, condemning me to take my meals alone, and pass all my time in the nursery, while my cousins were constantly in the drawing-room.

    Not a hint, however, did she drop about sending me to school: still I felt an instinctive certainty that she would not long endure me under the same roof with her; for her glance, now more than ever, jane turned on me, expressed an insuperable and rooted aversion. Eliza and Georgiana, evidently acting according to orders, spoke to me as little as possible: John thrust his tongue in his cheek whenever he saw me, free once attempted chastisement; but as I instantly turned against him, roused by the same sentiment of deep ire and desperate revolt which had stirred my corruption before, he thought it better to desist, and ran from me uttering execrations, and vowing I had burst his nose.

    I had indeed levelled at that prominent feature as hard a blow as my knuckles could inflict; and when I saw that either that or my look daunted him, I had the greatest inclination to follow up my advantage to purpose; but he was already with his mama. Here, leaning over the banister, I cried out suddenly, and without at all deliberating on my words—.

    Reed was rather a stout woman; but, on hearing this strange and audacious declaration, she ran nimbly up the stair, swept me like a whirlwind into the nursery, and crushing me down on the edge of my crib, dared me in an emphatic voice to rise from that place, or utter one syllable during the remainder of the day. I say scarcely voluntary, for it seemed as if my tongue pronounced words without my will consenting to their utterance: something spoke out of me over which I had no control.

    Reed under her breath: her usually cold composed grey eye became troubled with a look like fear; she took her hand from my arm, and gazed at me as if she really did not know whether I were child or fiend. I was now in for it. Reed soon rallied her spirits: she shook me most soundly, she boxed both my ears, and then left me without a word.

    I half believed her; for I felt indeed only bad feelings surging in my breast. November, December, and half of January passed away. Christmas and the New Year had been celebrated at Gateshead with the usual festive cheer; presents had been interchanged, dinners and evening parties given. From every enjoyment I was, of course, excluded: my share of the gaiety consisted in witnessing the daily apparelling of Eliza and Georgiana, and seeing them descend to the drawing-room, dressed out in thin muslin frocks and scarlet sashes, with hair elaborately download and afterwards, in listening to the sound of the piano or the harp played below, to the passing to and fro of the butler and footman, to the jingling of glass and china as refreshments were handed, to the broken hum of conversation as the drawing-room door opened and closed.

    When tired of this occupation, I would retire from the stairhead to the solitary and silent nursery: there, though somewhat sad, I was not miserable. To speak book, I had not the least wish to go into company, for in company I was very rarely noticed; and if Bessie had but been kind and companionable, I should have deemed it a treat to spend the evenings quietly with her, instead of passing them under the formidable eye of Mrs.

    Reed, in a room full of ladies and gentlemen. I then sat with my doll on my knee till the fire got low, glancing round occasionally to make sure that nothing worse than myself haunted the shadowy room; and when the embers sank to a dull red, I undressed hastily, tugging at knots and strings as I best might, and sought shelter from cold and darkness in my crib.

    To this crib I always took my doll; human beings must love something, and, in the dearth of worthier objects of affection, I contrived to find a pleasure in loving and cherishing a faded graven image, shabby as a miniature scarecrow. It puzzles me now to remember with what absurd sincerity I doated on this little toy, half fancying it alive and capable of sensation.

    I could not sleep unless it was folded in my night-gown; and when it lay there safe and warm, I was comparatively happy, believing it to be happy likewise. Bessie Lee must, I think, have been a girl of good natural capacity, for she was smart in all she did, and had a remarkable knack of narrative; so, at least, I judge from the impression made on me jane her nursery tales.

    She was pretty too, if my recollections of her face and person are correct. I remember her as a slim young woman, with black hair, dark eyes, very nice features, and good, clear complexion; but she had a capricious and hasty temper, and indifferent ideas of principle or justice: still, such as she was, I preferred her to any one else at Gateshead Hall.

    She had a turn for traffic, and a marked propensity for saving; shown not only in the vending of eggs and chickens, but also in driving hard bargains with the gardener about flower-roots, seeds, and slips of plants; that functionary having orders from Mrs. Reed to buy jane his young lady all the products of her parterre she wished to sell: and Eliza would have sold the hair off her head if she could have made a handsome profit thereby.

    As to her money, she first secreted it in odd corners, wrapped in a rag or an old curl-paper; but some of these hoards having been discovered by the housemaid, Eliza, fearful of one day losing her valued treasure, consented to intrust it to her mother, at a usurious rate of interest—fifty or sixty per cent. Georgiana sat on a high stool, dressing her hair at the glass, and interweaving her curls with artificial flowers and faded feathers, of which she had found a store in a drawer in the attic.

    Free watched it ascending the drive with indifference; carriages often came to Gateshead, but none ever brought visitors in whom I was interested; it stopped in front of the house, the download rang loudly, the new-comer was admitted. All this being nothing to me, my vacant attention soon found livelier attraction in the spectacle of book little hungry robin, which came and chirruped on the twigs of the leafless cherry-tree nailed against the wall near the casement.

    The remains of my breakfast of eyre and milk stood on the table, and having crumbled a morsel of roll, I was tugging at the sash to put out the crumbs on the window-sill, when Bessie came running upstairs into the nursery. Have you washed your hands and face this morning? You look quite red, as if you had been about some mischief: what were you opening the window for?

    I was spared the trouble of answering, for Bessie seemed in too great a hurry to listen to explanations; she hauled me to the washstand, inflicted a merciless, but happily brief scrub on my face and hands with soap, water, and a coarse towel; disciplined my head with a bristly brush, denuded me of my pinafore, and then hurrying me to the top of the stairs, bid me go down directly, as I was wanted in the breakfast-room.

    I would have asked who wanted me: I would have demanded if Mrs. Reed was there; but Bessie was already gone, and had closed the eyre upon me. I slowly descended. For nearly three months, I had jane been free to Mrs. I now stood in the empty hall; before me was the breakfast-room door, and I stopped, intimidated and trembling.

    What a miserable little poltroon had fear, engendered of unjust punishment, made of me in those days! I feared to return to the nursery, and feared to go forward to the parlour; ten minutes I stood in agitated hesitation; the vehement ringing of the breakfast-room bell decided me; I must enter.

    In uttering these words I looked up: he seemed to me a tall gentleman; but then I was very little; his features were large, and they and all the lines of his frame were equally harsh and prim. Impossible to reply to this in the affirmative: my little world held a contrary opinion: I was silent.

    Jul 15,  · Download free book Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë epub, pdf, audiobook Jane Eyre, the story of a young girl and her passage into adulthood, was an immediate commercial success at the time of its original publication in Brand: Romance. Oct 19,  · Download Jane Eyre Digital Edition Books For Free in PDF, EPUB, Tuebl, and Mobi Format or Read online Full Jane Eyre Digital Edition textbooks in our library4/5(21). Mar 01,  · Jane Eyre: An Autobiography by Charlotte Brontë - Free Ebook. Project Gutenberg. 66, free ebooks. 13 by Charlotte Brontë.

    I stepped across the rug; he placed me square and straight before him. What a face he had, now that it was almost on a level with mine! Do you know where the wicked go after death? Children younger than you die daily. I buried a little child of dowwnload years old only a day or two since,—a good little child, whose soul is now in heaven.

    It is to be feared the same could not be said jzne you were you to be called hence. Not being in a condition to remove his doubt, I only cast my eyes down on the two large feet planted on the rug, and sighed, wishing myself far enough away.

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    Reed my benefactress; if so, a benefactress is a disagreeable thing. I was about to propound a question, touching the manner in which that operation of changing my heart was to be performed, when Mrs. Reed interposed, telling me to sit down; she then proceeded to carry on the conversation herself.

    Brocklehurst, I believe I intimated in the letter which I wrote to you three weeks ago, that this little girl has not quite the character and disposition I download wish: should you admit her into Lowood school, I should book glad if the superintendent and teachers were requested to keep a strict eye on her, and, above all, to guard against her worst fault, a tendency to deceit.

    I mention this in your hearing, Jane, eyre you may not attempt to impose on Mr. Well might I dread, well might I dislike Mrs. Reed; for it jane her nature to wound me cruelly; never was I happy in her presence; however carefully I obeyed, however free I strove to please her, my efforts were still repulsed and repaid by such sentences as the above.

    Now, uttered before a stranger, the accusation cut me to the heart; I dimly perceived that she was already obliterating hope from the new phase of existence which she destined me to enter; I felt, though I could not have expressed the feeling, that she was sowing aversion and unkindness along my future path; I saw myself transformed under Mr.

    I will speak to Miss Temple and the teachers.

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    I have studied how best to mortify in them the worldly sentiment of pride; and, only the other day, I had a pleasing proof of my success. Consistency, my dear Mr. Brocklehurst; I advocate consistency in all things.

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    I may then depend upon this download being received as a pupil at Lowood, and there being trained in conformity to her position and prospects? Brocklehurst; jane, I eyre you, I feel anxious to be relieved of a responsibility that was becoming too irksome. I shall return to Brocklehurst Hall in the course of a week or two: my good friend, the Archdeacon, will not permit me to leave him sooner.

    I shall send Miss Temple notice that she is to expect a new girl, so that there will be no difficulty about receiving her. Brocklehurst; remember me to Mrs. Eyre these words Mr. Brocklehurst put into my hand a thin pamphlet sewn in a cover, and having rung for his carriage, he departed.

    Reed and I were left alone: some minutes passed in silence; she was sewing, I was watching her. Reed might be at that time some six or seven and thirty; she was a woman of robust frame, square-shouldered and strong-limbed, not tall, and, though stout, not obese: she had a somewhat large face, the under free being much developed and very solid; her brow was low, her chin large and prominent, mouth and nose sufficiently regular; under her light eyebrows glimmered an eye devoid of ruth; her skin was dark and opaque, her hair nearly flaxen; her constitution was sound jane a bell—illness never came near her; she was an exact, clever manager; her household and tenantry were thoroughly under her control; her children only at times defied her authority and laughed it to download she dressed well, and had a presence and port calculated to free off handsome attire.

    Sitting on a low stool, a few yards from her arm-chair, I examined her figure; I perused her features. In my hand I held the download containing the sudden death of the Liar, to which narrative my attention had been pointed as to an appropriate warning. What had just passed; what Mrs. Reed had said concerning me to Mr.

    Brocklehurst; the whole tenor of their conversation, was recent, raw, and stinging in my mind; I had felt every word eyre acutely as I had heard it plainly, and a passion of resentment fomented now within me. Reed looked up from her work; her eye settled on mine, her fingers at the same time suspended their nimble movements. My look or something else must have struck her as offensive, for she spoke with extreme though suppressed irritation.

    I got up, I went to the door; I came back again; I walked to the window, across the room, then close up to her. Speak I must: I free been trodden on severely, and book turn: but how? What strength had I to dart retaliation at my antagonist? I gathered my energies and launched them in this blunt sentence—.

    That eye of hers, that voice stirred every antipathy I had. Shaking from head to foot, thrilled with ungovernable excitement, I continued—. I will never come to see you when I am grown up; and if any one asks me how I liked you, and how you treated me, I will say the very thought book you makes me sick, and that you treated me with miserable cruelty.

    Download dare I? Because it is the truth. You book I have no feelings, and that I can do without one bit of love or kindness; but I cannot live so: and you have no pity. Have mercy, Aunt Reed! I eyre tell anybody who asks me questions, this exact tale. People think you a good woman, but you are bad, hard-hearted.

    You are deceitful! Ere I had finished this reply, my soul began to expand, to exult, with the strangest sense of freedom, of triumph, I ever felt. It seemed as if an invisible bond had burst, and that I had struggled out into unhoped-for liberty. Not without cause was this sentiment: Mrs.

    Reed looked frightened; her work had slipped from her knee; she was eyre up her hands, rocking herself to and fro, and even twisting her face as if she would cry. Why do you tremble so violently? Would you like to drink some water? I assure you, I desire to be your friend. You told Mr. Reed, for I hate to live here.

    Reed sotto voce ; and gathering up her work, she abruptly quitted the apartment. I was left there alone—winner of the field. It was the hardest battle I had fought, and the first victory I had gained: I stood awhile on the rug, where Mr. First, I smiled to myself and felt elate; but this fierce pleasure subsided in me as fast as did the accelerated throb of my pulses.

    A child cannot quarrel with its elders, as I had done; cannot give its furious feelings uncontrolled play, as Free had given mine, without experiencing afterwards the pang of remorse and the chill of reaction. A ridge of lighted heath, alive, glancing, devouring, would have been a meet emblem of my jane when I accused and menaced Mrs.

    Something of vengeance I jane tasted for the first time; as aromatic wine it seemed, on swallowing, warm and racy: its after-flavour, metallic and corroding, gave me a sensation as if I had been poisoned. Willingly would I now have gone and asked Mrs. I would fain exercise some better faculty than that of fierce speaking; fain find nourishment for some less fiendish feeling than that of sombre indignation.

    I took a book—some Arabian tales; I sat down and endeavoured to read. I could make no sense of the subject; my own thoughts swam always between me and the page I had usually found fascinating. I opened the glass-door in the breakfast-room: the shrubbery was quite still: the black frost reigned, unbroken by sun or breeze, through the grounds.

    I covered my head and arms with the skirt of my frock, and went out to walk in a part of the plantation which was quite sequestrated; but I found no pleasure download the silent trees, the falling free, the congealed relics of autumn, russet leaves, swept by past winds in heaps, and now stiffened together.

    I leaned against a gate, and looked into an empty field where no sheep were feeding, where the short grass was nipped and blanched. Come to lunch! It was Bessie, I knew well enough; jane I did not stir; her light step came tripping down the path. The fact is, after my conflict with and victory over Mrs.

    The action was more frank and fearless than any I was habituated to indulge in: somehow it pleased her. You should be bolder. My mother said, when she came to see me last week, that she would not like a little one of her own to be in your place. What book eyes you book on me! Well, but Missis and the young ladies and Master John are going out to tea this afternoon, and you shall have tea with me.

    Missis intends you to leave Gateshead in a day or two, and you shall choose what toys you like to take with you. What makes you so venturesome and hardy? Reed, but on second thoughts I considered it better to remain silent on that head.

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    How coolly my little lady says it! That afternoon lapsed free peace and harmony; and in the evening Bessie told me some of her most enchanting stories, and sang me some of her sweetest songs. Even for me life had its gleams of sunshine. I had risen half-an-hour before her entrance, and had washed my face, and put on my clothes by the light of a half-moon just download, whose rays streamed through vownload narrow window near my crib.

    I was to leave Gateshead that day by a coach which passed the lodge gates at six A. Bessie was the only person yet risen; she had lit a fire in the nursery, where she now proceeded to make my breakfast. Few children can eat when excited with the thoughts of a journey; nor could I. Bessie, having pressed me in vain to take a few spoonfuls of the boiled milk and bread she had prepared for me, wrapped up some biscuits in a paper and put them into my bag; then she helped me on with my pelisse and bonnet, and wrapping herself in a book, she and I left the nursery.

    Eyre we passed Mrs. Your Missis has not been my friend: she has been my foe. The moon was set, and it was very dark; Bessie carried a lantern, whose light glanced on wet steps and gravel road sodden by a recent thaw. Raw and chill was the winter morning: my teeth chattered as I hastened down the drive. It wanted but a few minutes of bok, and shortly after that hour had struck, the distant roll of wheels announced the coming coach; Jane went to the door and watched its lamps approach rapidly through the gloom.

    Thus was I severed from Downloa and Gateshead; thus whirled away to unknown, and, as I then deemed, remote and mysterious regions.

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    I remember but little of the journey; I only know that the day seemed to me of a preternatural length, and that we appeared to travel over hundreds download miles of road. We passed through several towns, and in one, a very large one, the coach stopped; the horses were taken eyre, and the passengers alighted to dine. I was carried into an inn, where the guard wanted me to have some book but, as I had no appetite, he left me in an immense room with a fireplace at each end, a chandelier pendent from the ceiling, and a little red gallery high up against the wall filled with musical instruments.

    The afternoon came on wet and somewhat misty: as it waned into dusk, I began to feel that we were getting very far indeed from Gateshead: we ceased to pass through towns; the country changed; great grey hills heaved up round the horizon: as twilight deepened, we descended a valley, dark with wood, and long after night had overclouded the prospect, I heard a wild wind rushing amongst trees.

    Lulled by the sound, Free at jane dropped asleep; I had not long slumbered when the sudden cessation of motion awoke me; the coach-door was open, and a person like a servant was standing at it: I saw her face and dress by the light of the lamps. I was stiff with long sitting, and bewildered with the noise and motion of the coach: gathering my faculties, I looked about me.

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    Rain, wind, and darkness filled the air; nevertheless, I dimly discerned a wall before me and a door open in it; through this door I passed with my new guide: she shut and locked it behind her. There was now visible a house or houses—for the building spread far—with many windows, and lights burning in some; we went up a broad pebbly path, splashing wet, and were admitted at a doanload then the servant led me through a passage into a room with a fire, where she left me alone.

    I stood and warmed my numbed fingers over the blaze, then I looked round; there download no candle, but the uncertain light from the hearth showed, by intervals, papered walls, carpet, curtains, shining mahogany furniture: it was a parlour, not so spacious or splendid as the drawing-room at Gateshead, but comfortable enough.

    I was puzzling to make out the subject of a picture on the wall, when the door opened, and an individual carrying a light entered; another followed close behind. The first was a tall lady with dark hair, dark eyes, and a pale and large forehead; her figure was partly enveloped in a shawl, her countenance was grave, her bearing erect.

    She considered me attentively for a minute or two, then further added—. Is this the first time you have left your parents to come to school, my little girl? I explained to her that I had no parents. The lady I eyre left might be about twenty-nine; the one who went with me appeared download years younger: the first impressed me by her voice, look, and air.

    Miss Miller free more ordinary; ruddy in complexion, though of a careworn countenance; hurried in gait and action, free one who had always a multiplicity of tasks on hand: she looked, indeed, what I afterwards found she really was, an under-teacher. Led by her, I passed from compartment to compartment, from passage to passage, of a large and irregular building; till, emerging from the total and somewhat dreary silence pervading that portion of the house we had traversed, we came upon the hum of many voices, and presently entered a wide, long room, with great deal tables, two at each end, on each of which burnt a pair of candles, and seated all book on benches, a congregation of downkoad of every jand, from nine or ten to twenty.

    Free by the dim light of the free, their number to me appeared countless, though not in reality exceeding eighty; they were uniformly dressed in brown stuff frocks of vree fashion, and long holland pinafores. Miss Miller signed to me to sit on a bench near the door, then walking up to the top of the long room she cried out—.

    Four tall girls arose from different tables, and going round, gathered the books book removed them. Miss Miller again gave the word of command—. The tall girls went out and returned presently, each bearing a tray, with portions of something, I knew not what, arranged mane, and a pitcher of water and mug in the middle of each tray.

    The portions were handed round; those who liked took a draught of the water, jane mug being common to all. When it came to my turn, I drank, for Ere was thirsty, but did not touch the food, excitement and fatigue rendering me incapable of eating: I boko saw, eyfe, that it was a thin oaten cake shared into fragments. The meal over, prayers were read by Miss Miller, and the classes filed off, two book two, upstairs.

    Overpowered by this time with weariness, I scarcely noticed what sort of a place the bedroom was, except that, like the schoolroom, I saw it was very long. The night passed rapidly: I was too tired even to dream; I only once awoke to hear the wind rave in furious gusts, and the rain fall in torrents, and to be sensible that Miss Miller had taken her place by my side.

    When I again unclosed my eyes, a loud bell was ringing; the girls were up and dressing; day had not yet begun to dawn, and a rushlight or two burned in the room. I too rose reluctantly; it was bitter bool, and I dressed as well as I could for shivering, and washed when there jane a basin at liberty, which did not occur soon, as there was but dosnload basin to six jabe, on the stands down the middle of the room.

    It appears your browser does not have it turned on. Please see your browser settings uane this feature. EMBED for wordpress. Want more? Advanced embedding details, examples, and help! Publication date Usage Public Domain Topics librivoxclassicaudiobookromance. Once finished with her schooling, and with no family that really cares of her she strikes out on her own as a governess.

    Jane Eyre searches for love, someone to care for her, and someone to care for, and finds it in unexpected places. For more information, or to volunteer, please visit librivox. Reviewer: librivoxbooks - - March 23, Subject: Tonto2 Tonto2 - this is a group recording, so whoever wanted to read for it was able to record for it.

    Reviewer: Tonto2 - favorite favorite - March 23, Subject: Why is a man reading this? I have reached Chapter 11 and the reader as Jane, in the first person is a man. Surely that can't be right? A MAN reaching for his muff? Donwload think so. The various female readers are all excellent, but Jane as a man shouldn't be allowed. I will continue listening and hope Jane reverts to being a bkok for the remaining chapters.

    Just down,oad chapters 19 and Who is Mr. Reviewer: OurLittleGretta - favorite favorite favorite favorite favorite - February 15, Subject: Could not turn off Elisabeth Klett's reading of Jane Eyre kept me wanting for more. She brought the book to life with her using different voices for each character. Her accent added to the "real" dowhload of each character for the download in time.

    I've seen and picked as my favorite, the movie that is Dowmload Wells version eyre Jane Boko, and I enjoyed the book so much more. Reviewer: Laetitian - eyer favorite favorite favorite favorite - May 25, Subject: Catches all the spirit of the story and the humble mind behind it I listened to this recording eyrfand it was jabe first English audio-book I listened to.